Under the Shadow - Rage and Revolution in Modern Turkey

Review :

Diverse voices skilfully captured and more relevant than ever Thanks to Net Galley and to I.B. Tauris for offering me a free ARC copy of the book that I freely choose to review.
This is the first book by Kaya Genç I've read, and I hope it won't be the last. He does a great job of collecting testimonies of many youths, from different social classes, religious backgrounds and political beliefs, and presenting a balanced account of the different points of views and how the interviewees developed their stance and thoughts. It is clear that the author is a great communicator, in sync with his subjects, and understands them well. He is also skilled at capturing the nuances and peculiarities of the youths he interviews, whose voices come across clear and distinctive.
The author does not take sides (if there's such a thing as sides), but he provides his reflections on Turkey and Istanbul itself, in a language that is nostalgic and poetic at times. He does draw historical parallels (also mentioned by several of the participants) with previous movements in Turkey and in the introduction mentions recent events (that are not discussed in the body of the book, as it looks mostly at the period between 2013 and 2015). It is difficult to read the book and not to think about the historical moment we live in, and some of the comments made throughout the book (about the role of public protests in democracies, about banning headscarves and outward religious symbols, about imprisoning journalists and the influence of social media) are as relevant to the situation in other countries as they are to Turkey's.
A couple of examples of some of the sentences that made me think:
Now, as cries for an east-west war echo throughout the world, I am afraid of the world turning into a place like Turkey, governed almost permanently by martial law.
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Once he concludes his story, Fettaholu seems calmer. 'What I just told you about is not the result of politicization', he says. 'It is the result of a sort of void. People are radicalized and they act like hooligans. Politicization should be an intellectual process To hate the other side', Fettaholu says, 'is not, cannot be, politicization. No.' A final pause. 'It is only hatred of ignorance.'
I enjoyed, in particular, the different voices and individual accounts, like glimpses into the young men and women's lives, the clear links between the personal and the political (the book is about political ideas but mostly about people, who sometimes reach similar conclusions or feel similarly about certain issues even if they come at them from different political positions and outlooks are very different), the passion and the determination and the touching moments shared too (a mother who didn't like her daughter's political ideas sharing a picture of her signed book on Facebook, a young man surprised on seeing his father cry when he hears about the death of a journalist)
I am not an expert in Turkish politics or history and enjoyed enormously the book, which is skilfully and beautifully written, and I'd recommend this book to anybody who has even a passing interest in the subject. I also look forward to reading more works by the author (and I've heard he'll publish a novel soon. I'll be on the lookout).


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